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Long Nose International

  
   I had to do a double take when I first saw this truck because the nose in soo long. It must have a huge motor in it for heavy work.

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Pink Dump Truck


    I ran across this today by Robert Henri in the "Art Spirit".
     When the majority of students and the majority of so-called arrived artists go out into landscape, saying they intend to look for a "motive," they too ofter mean, unconsciously enough, that it is their intention to look until they have found an arrangement they have seen and liked in the galleries. A hundred times, perhaps, they have walked by their own subject, felt it, enjoyed it, but having no estimate of their own personal sensations, lacking faith in themselves, pass on until they come to this established taste of another. But such an artist is not having a good time. A snake without a skin might make a fair job of crawling into another snake's shedding, but I guess no snake would be fool enough to bother with it.

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Flatiron Cafe


10x8


       It was a freaky day in May I think..Jennifer McChristian's painting class in Jerome. It was freezing cold and raining. It actually snowed that day. Carol Marine, myself and a few others stood out in it and painted. Here is a shot of Jennifer working on this painting. I emptied the palette out 5-6 times while she worked. She had to quit when it started pouring again. I finished it up in the studio later.   Notice how close the value range is when it is cloudy and raining. 

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Cinque Terre

 
   This was a wonderful little village along the western coast of Italy. I hiked along the edge of the ocean with my plein air equipment and painted on the way. There were vineyards, flowers, and the streets of the villages were all enchanting.

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MACK Fire Truck


    Mack trucks were always supposed to be the biggest and baddest trucks of them all when I was a kid. Everyone would say "looks like he was hit by a Mack truck". Well here is a Mack Fire Truck.

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Snub Nose Dodge


    This row of trucks were the first ones to great me when I walked down the path to enter the truck lot. I knew I was going to like this place a lot! I felt like these trucks were telling the leader not to worry as they were right behind him.

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Bud's Dump Truck

 
      My grandpa drove a dump truck back in Kansas. He taught me how to fish. We would go down into Missouri with his boat and catch catfish. This truck reminded me of him.

A quote from Edgar Payne in "Composition of outdoor painting".
   A pictorial representation is always a translation. Nature suggests ideas for interpretation, the artist supplies ideas of how the interpretation is to be made.

     The whole scene around this truck was full of bright green grass, other trucks, and many more interesting things. To orchestrate the importance of the yellow dump truck, I had to simplify and delete almost all of these other interesting things. The grass and ground plane I did keep, but I grayed down the bright intense greens and other bright colors and value contrasts to bring more attention back to the dump truck.
  

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After the flood


     There is a certain kind of deciduous tree that grows in the desert around where I live. It seems to thrive even in the absence of water during drought conditions. I think it may be called Arizona Ash, which puts out a lot of shade. There was a small AZ Ash growing down by the river behind my studio. A huge flood came and washed away most all the trees and bushes at what used to be the river's edge. Somehow this one little tree managed to survive. I watched it for awhile down there and finally decided I needed to go down and paint it. So here it is.

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Painting in the rain.


   I literally painted this one in the rain. I had to stop numerous times to empty my palette because it was full of water. The oil repels the water so you can go on painting as normal, but if the water gets too deep then it gets a little sloshy.

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Rescue Truck

  
  Up on the top of the hill where all these trucks are is a steam wood mill. There was a crew cutting down paradise trees and putting them through the mill. The guy running the steam engine really loved blowing the whistle.
     This little tow truck looked like it had been a hard worker in it's time.

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Mr. White

  
   This guy just looked somewhat sofisticated compared to many of his big rusty neighbor trucks around the lot. I thought maybe this one might be from Europe maybe, but I don't know.

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Gold Mine

 
   Carol and I really got on a roll with those trucks in Silverton. When I got back home here in Arizona I remembered some old trucks up in Jerome. The last time I painted there was over 10 years ago. The owner was still around, he looks like one of the band members of ZZ TOP. He was willing to let me stay on the property so I could get up and paint early in the morning, but he had another guy staying there with expensive exotic cats running around; Jack doesn't like cats so we moved on. I did get some painting done and will be going back as soon as the monsoons pass over. This first one was a beauty that really stood out in the crowd for me.

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American custom made frames

                                  
    I wanted to display the quality of the frames that come with my paintings. The style and color may vary, but the quality is consistant. 
     First the frame is cut from solid wood raw stock, corners glued with biscuits and clamped with steel spring clamps. Later the frame corners are matched by hand with a small chisel and then the whole frame is sanded with 3 grades of paper by hand. The frames are sprayed with a white primer and sanded again with a couple grades of sandpaper. The the red is spray and they are re-sanded again. The gold leaf is applied very carefully by hand and a specialist antiques each frame to match the painting. All the frames are spray lacquered. They are made at Mountain View Frame Company in Cottonwood, Arizona.

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Jack and Lexi


   This meadow is where we camped when we painted in Rico. It's right around 10,000 feet. These are my two dogs Jack and Lexi.
   I also own an art material business where we make an easel that Carol and many other artists use. ART BOX AND PANEL COMPANY.
   Everyone has their own opinion about what "ART" is and "ARTISTS" is or isn't. I have known a lot of "Successful" artists. In "my opinion" I have more respect and appreciation for artists and their art if they are constantly changing and trying new things. These artists are more about emotions and communication than techniques or formulas. They have more failures than "successful" artists because of this. We learn from failures, if we are not failing once i awhile we are not risking anything. We are not trying to expand.
   I just want to say that I have alot of respect and appreciation for Carol Marine as an artist and a person. For anyone to paint on an average of one painting a day for years shows a commitnent and determination to their art. She has become very successful and yet she acts humble and hungry all the time. She is generous and supportive to other artists. She is very knowledgeable in orchestrating all the elements for success in a painting, and a genious at color. On top of all that she likes to try new things, like plein air painting or painting outdoors. As an artist she's a hard worker but not too serious that the fun and laughter is left out. I was the more experienced outdoor painter on this trip, but I still learned a few things from working beside Carol. Thank you Carol for everything.

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The Last Day


     I was finishing up my morning painting of the old trucks. Carol finished hers of the monster truck and went scouting down the alley. She came back and said there was a bunch of great stuff down there. I went back to the camper and got Jack and Lexi (my 2 dogs) and we headed down the alley. I spotted this blue thing down the way, just something about the color? Carol was across the street painting a backhoe. I set up and started painting, Lexi was laying under my chair in the shade and Jack was sniffing around in the grass hunting for something. In the distance the old train whistle from the Silverton/Durango Steam Engine somehow brought pictures of miners, horses and wagons, with busy saloons at night. That is a bit of what this trip always does to me. I love the cool fresh mountain air and these tiny old towns from the past. I thank my two painting partners Carol Marine and Penny Lentz for a wonderful trip. Carol's husband David and son Jacob are very cool guys too. It was full of laughter, good food, great friends, and the privledge of painting in the arms of nature.

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Monster Truck


     This truck caught my eye when I first drove into town. It is the "meanest" truck I had ever seen. It looks like it could eat other trucks! I couldn't get a very good photo of it, but here it is.

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Last day in Telluride


     It was the last morning and I was following Carol up and down the hills of Telluride before finally stopping at a spot. We saw alot of nice scenes, but sometimes it takes awhile for something to hit you hard enough to want to set up and start painting. Carol was scetching her thumbnails and I was leaning back sipping on my coffee, still waiting for that spark. Finally I decided if I was going to get a painting done I had just better grab a hold of something and get started. I had been seeing poppies all around town and wanting to paint some, and there they were against the purple shadow of one of the the non-renovated homes in Telluride. I was just finishing up when a very nice girl came out of the house and exclaimed "Oh somebody is painting our home!" She looked at the painting and said she loved it and ask if she could buy it. Her and her husband had sold the house and had to move out soon.  She was very happy and I was able to fufill my purpose as an artist.

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Hot Grease and Oil


 
     These trucks were just across the street from our RV park. They were the first things we saw when we drove up that morning. Incredible specimens of a not too long ago era of very heavy rugged, but leaky smelly trucks. Someone from the UK recently ask me why do Americans paint all these "trucks"? I gave her my theory that it is more prevelant in the west where many of us still have some "cowboy" in our souls and these pickups are our "horses". 

A quote from Robert Henri in his book "The Art Spirit":
   There are many craftsmen who paint pleasantly the surface apperances and are very clever at it.
   There are always a few who get at and feel the undercurrent, and these simple use the surface appearances selecting them and using them as tools to express the undercurrent, the real life.
   If I cannot feel and undercurrent, then I see only a series of things. They may be attractive and novel at first but soon grow tiresome.
                     
 

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Painting in the Night

                                                                
     Well taking about a challenge. I think Carol says it all in her blog. I couldn't really tell what I was painting. I think I was getting a lot of glare off a bunch of bright lights behind me that was shining on my panel. Carol and I didn't even take them back out to look at them in the daylight for a couple days. Mine didn't look anywhere like I thought it would. I liked Carol's. It was a ton of fun and I am going to do it again for sure.

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Alley behind Green Tavern


     Well here's that green again, only it was more intense in the afternoon. This is the same tavern I painted on the other side in the morning. It's debatable whether this painting really works with the pole in the middle. I had it going off more to the right, but it was too much of an angle so I straightened it. Also the high contrast and bright red of the propane tank was an eye catcher toward the edge of the painting. I broke a few rules, but I believe that once in awhile you have to throw everything out and just let it ride. I had to re-work this one a little in the studio when I got home, which I normally don't like to do.

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First one


     This was the first painting I did upon arriving in Colorado. I hadn't painted for awhile so felt a little rusty. Something about the shape of the building and that green color grabbed me, so I knew I had to make a stab at it. While I was painting it a guy (his name might have been Ken?) in a jeep came by and stopped. He told me I gave him a painting of a fire truck a few years ago when I was painting there. I didn't remember until later, it didn't turn out like I wanted and he seemed to like it alot. I don't know why I gave it to him, it's not anything I normally do. He wanted to buy this one, he told me it use to be the town tavern many years ago. He came back in a little while with my dentist Mick who has a place in Rico. We talked for a little while.  I was pleased with how this one came out. It was more in what I was "feeling" about the scene.

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Chevy Pickup


     Carol was the first to stop this one, but I knew I had to paint it. I had 3 of these trucks in my yard when I was in my 20s. I was switching engines and transmissions to get one that would run. I got a little too much caught up in "details" because of my emotional attachment, which inhibited my "design" somewhat. What the heck, I had a great time painting it.

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